NoSQL

Basho Releases Enterprise Riak 2.0 With Apache Solr Powered Search And Expanded Support For Distributed Data Types

Basho technologies today announces the release of Riak Enterprise 2.0, the production-grade NoSQL database that competes primarily with Cassandra. Riak Enterprise 2.0 features renovated search functionality by means of the integration of Apache Solr, the open source enterprise search platform. Each Riak node will now contain an instance of Apache Solr that enables enhanced search functionality throughout the Riak platform. This release also features expanded support for distributed data types such as counters, sets, flags and maps that facilitate conflict resolution in an eventually consistent data environment. Use cases for Riak involve datasets that change both with limited frequency and in real-time. The use case marked by a limited rate of change of data includes customers in the insurance and claims industry that leverage Riak to allow their members to locate physician practices or the nearest automobile repair center. Conversely, other use cases for Riak involve data collection from household appliances or devices such as fitness wearables marked by hugely dynamic data streams.

In addition to enhanced search functionality and an expanded range of distributed data types, Riak Enterprise 2.0 features simplified configuration management and more advanced security via more finely grained role-based access functionality. In all, today’s release represents a notable enrichment of a product that, in conjunction with Riak CS, is used by a third of Fortune 50 companies for applications and cloud storage. The release of Riak Enterprise 2.0 builds upon a recent decision by the National Health Service to use Basho’s Enterprise Riak platform to power Spine, the NHS’s electronic medical records platform that stores data for over 20,000 points of medical care across England. As such, Riak Enterprise 2.0 signals the intensification of battles for market share in the key-value NoSQL space, particularly given DataStax’s recent hefty $106M Series E capital raise.

Categories: Basho Technologies, NoSQL | Tags: ,

DataStax Closes $106M In Series E Funding

Last week, DataStax announced the finalization of $106M in Series E funding in a round led by Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers. The funding raise featured participation from new investors ClearBridge Investments, Cross Creek Advisors, Wasatch Funds, PremjiInvest and Comcast Ventures. Existing investors Lightspeed Venture Partners and Scale Venture Partners also contributed to the funding raise. DataStax has now raised a total of $190M, inclusive of a $45M capital raise in July 2013. The funding raise brings DataStax’s valuation to over $830M and positions it strongly to implement an IPO within the next two years.

DataStax delivers enterprise-grade distributed database platforms based on the open source project Apache Cassandra. Emil Eifrem, founder and CEO of Neo Technology, reflected on the significance of DataStax’s recent funding raise as follows:

The new investment in DataStax highlights the value of data and the operational tools for processing it in realtime. The old NoSQL umbrella term for alternative databases is now clearly fragmenting into a few distinct product categories: document, column-family/key-value and graphs. Significant investments in companies like DataStax ($106M), MongoDB ($150M–the largest round ever for a database company) and Couchbase ($60M) over the last year validates how important alternative databases are for most software today– and for all software tomorrow.

Here, Eifrem positions DataStax within the NoSQL category of “alternative databases” amongst the likes of MongoDB and Couchbase, both of which can also claim the distinction of significant capital raises over the last year. Eifrem notes how the investment in DataStax validates the importance of real-time data processing performed by “alternative databases” that fall into the categories of document, key-value or graph. Because DataStax delivers database technology that can run on low-cost hardware, it poses a significant competitive threat to Oracle, whose database management systems are associated with higher end hardware infrastructures. DataStax’s Chief Customer Officer Matt Pfeil noted that “roughly 80 percent of our opportunities are Oracle replacement” in an interview with Bloomberg that confirmed the market appetite for alternatives to relational database management systems. The bottom line here is that alternative databases are seeing increasing adoption in the enterprise and as such, represent the beginnings of a profound transformation in database management within the enterprise.

Categories: DataStax, NoSQL, Venture Capital | Tags:

Q&A With Dave McCrory, CTO of Basho Technologies, Regarding Riak, Riak CS and the NoSQL Landscape

Cloud Computing Today recently had the privilege of speaking with Dave McCrory, CTO of Basho Technologies, about the NoSQL space and Basho’s competitive differentiation within the NoSQL landscape. McCrory elaborated on Basho’s Riak “open source, distributed database” by noting its high availability, scalability and ability to handle any type of data as follows:

Cloud Computing Today: How do you envision the NoSQL space? What are your high level impressions of the competitive landscape amongst NoSQL vendors?

Dave McCrory (Basho Technologies): The NoSQL industry has many players for various use cases, but overall it is still young, especially from the enterprise point of view. I’ve been involved in big data for quite some time, and as data continues to grow, the NoSQL industry will grow with it. As the early adopters begin to move to the early majority – we are positioned in that space for crossing that chasm. Looking at how people want to build applications and data we will see, as an industry, in the next few years nearly half of enterprises will embrace NoSQL technologies to deal with the problems that traditional databases cannot deal with. Other NoSQL providers like MongoDB have an amazing presence in the market as it has made it easy for developers to give it a try. From my understanding from the market view, at the same time, it is limited in the actual applications that can be used. With so many companies offering NoSQL solutions for specific use cases and the high demand for data management, I can only see the industry continuing to expand and thrive.

Cloud Computing Today: Where do you see Basho within the larger NoSQL space at present?

Dave McCrory (Basho Technologies): We’re looking to provide the strongest key value solution and object store we can – that’s our priority right now. Although we at Basho are still a fairly young company, I think our technology speaks for itself. Since starting at Basho in the spring, I’ve been able to work with the outstanding Basho engineers and I’m amazed by what they have accomplished. Riak and Riak CS use simplified administrative features and a key/value system which enable anyone with command line experience to build a cluster in less than 15 minutes. I believe that Riak’s simplicity and usability are what separates it from other companies in the NoSQL space.

Some of that usability is our differentiation expressed in terms of high availability, fault tolerance and the ability to scale well beyond many of our competitors.

Cloud Computing Today: What are the key differentiators of Riak? What does Basho have planned for Riak in subsequent releases in the near future?

Dave McCrory (Basho Technologies): Riak’s key differentiators are its ability to offer high availability, massive scale and a variety of data types. Since Riak stores data as binary it is able to handle any type of data, unlike other solutions. Its top features include operational ease at large scales, always-on availability, and the ability to add and remove nodes easily and quickly as needed.

We are unique in that we have built object storage on our foundation and offer both key value and object store from the same platform. We have a thriving community, but our go to market in very focused on the enterprise. That has resulted in almost 200 enterprise customers including a third of the Fortune 50.

We have a lot planned for Basho and Riak in the coming months. We recently launched Riak CS 1.5 which offers additional Amazon S3 compatibility, performance improvement in garbage collection processes, and new, simplified administrative features. We are releasing Riak 2.0 in the fall which will provide enhanced search capability, expanded data types and more customer control over consistency, and we are hosting the annual RICON conference in Las Vegas in October, so you’ll be hearing a lot from Basho the rest of the year!

Categories: Basho Technologies, Big Data, NoSQL | Tags: ,

Cloudera And MongoDB Partner To Bring Hadoop and NoSQL Together

Cloudera and MongoDB recently announced a strategic partnership designed to allow customers to take advantage of Cloudera’s Hadoop distribution and MongoDB’s NoSQL platform. Details of the partnership remain scant although we do know that both companies are working on enhancing the current version of the MongoDB connector for Hadoop, which is certified to run on Cloudera Enterprise 5. The MongoDB Connector for Hadoop “is a plugin for Hadoop that provides the ability to use MongoDB as an input source and/or an output destination.” In other words, the MongoDB Connector for Hadoop enables Hadoop users to output data to MongoDB and conversely, to receive MongoDB within a Hadoop environment. Cloudera’s Chief Strategy Officer Mike Olsen commented on the partnership by noting:

Volume, variety and velocity all strain traditional operational databases, calling for a fundamental reconsideration of how companies store and process data. A Hadoop-powered enterprise data hub is an alternative center for data storage and analytics, and together with MongoDB, we empower companies to keep all of their data in full fidelity and at minimal cost, in order to power the data needs of all connected applications and IT infrastructure.

One direction for the partnership consists of the delivery of a turnkey Big Data solution with the analytic capabilities to mine both structured and unstructured data. From a product development standpoint, the obvious question concerns how much both vendors will invest in querying, analytic and predictive modeling capabilities that span both Hadoop and NoSQL. That said, the Big Data and cloud landscape has witnessed a proliferation of partnerships that lead to amalgamations of heterogeneous technology components within a larger institutional framework, but rarely result in genuine innovation and breakthrough technologies as noted in IBM’s Acquisition of Cloudant and The Walmart Effect In Tech. All this is to say that while the Cloudera-MongoDB partnership holds tremendous, even disruptive promise for the Big Data industry, partnerships represent a markedly prevalent fashion in contemporary tech based on the principles of collage and montage that sometimes result in innovation and disruptive technology platforms, but all too often deliver varied combinations of elemental technologies that disappoint in proportion to the capital and human talent brought together by the collaboration in question. Cloudera’s Mike Olsen will present further details regarding the partnership in his keynote address at MongoDB World in NYC on June 24.

Categories: Cloudera, Hadoop, MongoDB, NoSQL

Basho Appoints New CEO And CTO To Lead Riak, Its NoSQL Database Platform

Today, Basho named Adam Wray as CEO and Dave McCrory as CTO after recently losing outgoing CEO Greg Collins and CTO Justin Sheehy to other ventures. An open-source distributed database used by the likes of Best Buy, Comcast and the United Kingdom’s National Health Service, Basho’s flagship technology Riak delivers an enterprise-grade NoSQL platform marked by scalability, high availability and fault tolerance that can handle rapidly expanding datasets such as those from the internet of things, or telemetry, web-based and digital gaming data. In addition to Riak, Basho is the creator of Riak CS, a cloud-based object storage database. Incoming CEO Adam Wray commented on the market opportunity for Basho as follows:

Enterprises are getting serious about production-capable unstructured databases that scale, like NoSQL, and Basho is able to help them address this. Riak partners and investors support this need, and we have a long list of companies engaged to leverage our solutions – including The Weather Company, Best Buy and Comcast. I am looking forward to working with the management team and collaborating with the community and stakeholders to take advantage of the increasing enthusiasm within enterprises for non-structured databases that can scale across production environments.

Prior to Basho, Wray was most recently President and CEO of Iaas vendor Tier 3, which he grew to a company with a $10M+ annual rate from a startup with a small client base. Tier 3 was acquired by CenturyLink in November 2013. Previously, he held leadership roles at Amazon, Akamai Technologies and Limelight Networks. CTO McCrory comes to Basho after having served as SVP of engineering at Warner Music Group, senior architect at Cloud Foundry and cloud architect at VMware. Basho’s Riak technology competes against the likes of MongoDB, Cassandra, DataStax, CouchDB and Couchbase in a competitive NoSQL landscape that looks set to explode as enterprises become increasingly comfortable acquiring and managing non-relational datasets.

Categories: Basho Technologies, NoSQL | Tags: ,

KuroBase Releases Tools To Render NoSQL Platform Couchbase More Accessible On Heroku PaaS

NoSQL vendor Couchbase recently announced that its business partner KuroBase released a suite of products designed to render Couchbase more accessible on the Heroku platform as a service infrastructure. Specifically, KuroBase released the “Heroku Add-on for Couchbase” that allows users to provision an instance of Couchbase Server with the click of a mouse. In addition, KuroBase rendered available “Heroku Buildpacks for Ruby and Node.js” on GitHub that allow developers to quickly deploy applications coded in Ruby and Node.js within a Couchbase infrastructure on the Heroku platform. Collectively, the releases stand to render Couchbase’s NoSQL document-oriented database more widely available to the thousands of developers that use the Heroku platform and continue to accelerate its adoption. More importantly, the Couchbase-Kurobase partnership underscores the potential for synergistic collaborations between Platform as a Service (PaaS) and the NoSQL space. This week’s announcement by Couchbase illustrates the possibilities for PaaS to continue the acceleration of the adoption of NoSQL platforms for highly responsive, interactive applications in the mobile and online gaming space, amongst other use cases.

Categories: Couchbase, Heroku, NoSQL, Platform as a Service

IBM’s Acquisition of Cloudant And The Walmart Effect In Tech

Last week, IBM announced an agreement to acquire NoSQL database as a service vendor Cloudant for an undisclosed sum. An active contributor to the Apache CouchDB project, Cloudant delivers a JSON document database-based platform that claims high availability, scalability and elasticity amongst its attributes. Cloudant customers can take advantage of its JSON-based database as a service to store and mine structured and unstructured data from a variety of sources. Because the JSON database format is so widely used by developers of mobile and web applications, IBM’s acquisition of Cloudant stands to strengthen its positioning with respect to the development of applications for mobile devices in conjunction with the build out of its OpenStack-based cloud solution for the enterprise. The acquisition of Cloudant will be central to IBM’s MobileFirst solutions as well as its Worklight application for developing mobile applications. From an industry perspective, the acquisition represents a huge coup for the NoSQL space in general. CouchDB has historically not had the traction of MongoDB, Cassandra and Couchbase, so we should expect brand name tech companies to make similar offerings for the likes of MongoDB in the ensuing few months. Moreover, IBM’s acquisition of Cloudant testifies to the increasing emergence of cloud and big data behemoths with solutions for both hosting infrastructure, as well as database solutions that accommodate enterprise needs for scalability and the ability to store unstructured data. Cloudant CEO Derek Schoettle surmised the significance of Cloudant’s contribution to IBM’s SoftLayer cloud platform as follows:

Cloudant’s decision to join IBM highlights that the next wave of enterprise technology innovation has moved beyond infrastructure and is now happening at the data layer. Our relationship with IBM and SoftLayer has evolved significantly in recent years, with more connected devices generating data at an unprecedented rate. Cloudant’s NoSQL expertise, combined with IBM’s enterprise reliability and resources, adds data layer services to the IBM portfolio that others can’t match.

Schoettle notes that IBM is extending its infrastructure innovations to the “data layer” and as such, follows in the footsteps of Amazon Web Services and EMC/VMware spin-off Pivotal, which similarly deliver a combination of cloud and big data solutions in their platform and product offerings. The notable consequence of this convergence of cloud and big data product offerings is that only large enterprises with the requisite capital and resources can afford to cobble together combined cloud-big data product offerings. As a result, cloud startups and smaller data vendors will need to continue to compete by way of their agility, responsiveness, consultative support and superior technology. In effect, the IBM acquisition of Cloudant signals a Walmart effect in technology, of sorts, whereby large, well capitalized vendors have the ability to create marts of diverse data and analytics products that threaten the viability of cloud, big data and analytics startups in the same way that massive retailers such as Walmart threaten the viability of independent stores or small chains. Oracle’s recent acquisition of Blue Kai, a big data management platform geared toward marketing, constitutes another example of the way in which tech giants are continuing to integrate diverse data products into increasingly heterogeneous product portfolios. The question that remains unanswered, however, is whether the emerging Walmart technology maze is sufficiently easy to navigate that enterprises opt to partner either with one vendor for all of their technology needs, or whether they feel more comfortable shopping from a diverse range of technology vendors in order to avoid vendor lock-in and locate products that richly respond to the specificities of their industry-vertical and customer needs.

Categories: Big Data, Cloud Computing, Cloudant, Couchbase, IBM, MongoDB, NoSQL | Tags: , , , , ,

Blog at WordPress.com. The Adventure Journal Theme.