IaaS

IaaS Vendor CloudSigma Expands Presence In U.S. By Partnering With Equinix Locations In Silicon Valley And Miami

Public cloud IaaS vendor CloudSigma recently announced the expansion of its U.S. public cloud presence by adding service locations based at Equinix’s Silicon Valley and Boca Raton datacenters. The addition of the Silicon Valley and Boca Raton locations to CloudSigma’s Equinix Washington D.C. datacenter will reduce latency and improve performance and redundancy for customers in the U.S. CloudSigma CEO Robert Jenkins remarked on the significance of the company’s presence in Silicon Valley and Miami as follows:

Both Silicon Valley and Miami are regions where we are committed to serving with increased performance. Silicon Valley is already ahead of the curve in many respects when it comes to the cloud and cloud-based compute resources, but we also see a lot of promise with Latin America as companies go straight to the cloud to deal with the explosive growth they’re experiencing, especially in mobile services. These types of native cloud apps, alongside the progress we’re seeing with Internet of Things and Web services being developed in our cloud, will further the success of this expansion and lay the groundwork for more locations in the near future.

Here, Jenkins remarks on the promise implicit in the ability of both facilities, and the Miami facility in particular, to expand CloudSigma’s market penetration in Latin America. Jenkins understands CloudSigma’s expanded U.S. presence as facilitating the explosive growth in cloud-based mobile apps, in addition to emerging verticals specific to the internet of things. CloudSigma’s expanded partnership with Equinix reveals an astute strategic move to capture IaaS market share in Latin America while concurrently improving latency, performance and redundancy for U.S. and Latin American customers alike. The deal represents an especially strong coup for CloudSigma because improvements in latency are likely to be critical for the emerging proliferation of use cases marked by the confluence of big data and cloud computing platforms. As such, CloudSigma positions itself as another significant IaaS player in the  North American market that lies poised to take advantage of hiccups from major IaaS vendors such as the Azure outage from the last week

Categories: CloudSigma, IaaS

Rackspace Announces Managed Cloud Services, But Is It Enough?

Rackspace recently announced details of a managed cloud service plan that gives customers the opportunity to take advantage of managed services for their cloud deployments. The managed cloud service plan comes in two forms: (1) managed infrastructure, which provides advisory services regarding infrastructure set-up and architecture; and (2) managed operations, which enables Rackspace engineers to access customer servers to tweak code as necessary. The managed infrastructure and operations offerings represent Rackspace’s attempt to differentiate itself from competitors such as Amazon Web Services and Windows Azure, both of which demand greater responsibility on the part of developers and IT staff to provision, configure, deploy and manage Infrastructure as a Service environments. The introduction of the managed cloud service pivots on Rackspace’s famed “fanatical support” by building on the company’s strengths as a leader in consultative support for IaaS deployment and management. Rackspace President Taylor Rhodes summarized the new managed cloud offerings as follows:

Our basic level, called Managed Infrastructure, offers Fanatical Support with much more managed service than do the more-expensive, premium service levels offered by many of our competitors. Our higher service level, called Managed Operations, provides even more managed services, up the stack into the support of application level — addressing customer needs that most of our rivals won’t even touch.

Components of the managed infrastructure offering include architectural advice, support for workload migration and scaling, launch assistance and round the clock availability of cloud engineers to troubleshoot and resolve issues. Managed operations additionally delivers support for operating systems, web servers, database servers, cloud databases, cloud backup and monitoring and user provisioning and permissions. Rackspace’s managed infrastructure offering is priced at $.005/GB, assuming a $50 minimum per month while managed operations is priced at $.02/GB, with a $500 monthly minimum. In addition to its managed cloud service, Rackspace announced details of an expanded program for developers and more transparent pricing. Altogether, Rackspace’s new managed cloud offering is likely to give it some short term publicity and inject new life into its ailing IaaS positioning, but the San Antonio-based company will need a deeper transformation if it intends to seriously compete with the big players in the IaaS space, particularly given that competitors such as Amazon Web Services already partner with other vendors to offer managed services comparable to those revealed by Rackspace last Tuesday.

Categories: IaaS, Rackspace | Tags: , , ,

Datapipe Extends Range of Services Offered In Managed Cloud For Amazon Web Services

Datapipe today announced an expansion of its Managed Cloud for Amazon Web Services offering marked by the availability of enhanced functionality related to cloud security, risk management, the creation of hybrid cloud infrastructures and operational analytics. As an AWS Premier Consulting Partner, Datapipe’s Managed Cloud for Amazon Web Services delivers a fully managed solution for customers who would like to take advantage of the Amazon Web Services platform and its extraordinary range of features and ancillary product offerings. Specifically, Datapipe offers services that include round the clock issue resolution and monitoring, managed cloud provisioning, cloud scaling, database management, workload migration, SharePoint as a Service and orchestration. As a result of today’s announcement, Datapipe offers enhanced security and risk management solutions including advanced identity management and authentication services, managed security and threat alerts, backup and recovery options that leverage hybrid cloud infrastructures such as Datapipe’s on-premise datacenters and enterprise-level governance and security policies. In addition, Datapipe launches a “Managed hybrid cloud connect” solution that allows customers to create hybrid cloud infrastructures composed of the Amazon Web Services Cloud with Datapipe’s on-premise datacenters in Seattle, WA, Silicon Valley, Ashburn, VA, London and Singapore. Importantly, Datapipe’s “Managed hybrid cloud connect” solution leverages AWS Direct Connect, the dedicated connection to Amazon Web Services that bypasses the public internet. Finally, Datapipe revealed the availability of operational analytics about a customer’s AWS infrastructure that enables customers to track usage trends and operational KPIs towards the end of optimizing the performance of their deployments. Today’s announcement by Datapipe underscores the heterogeneity of strategic alliances in the IaaS space whereby vendors such as Datapipe partner with a leading IaaS player to deliver a fully managed offering with an increasingly rich range of features that enables enterprise customers to access a turnkey solution that meets their needs for infrastructure monitoring, security, data resilience and analytics. The industry should expect more vendors to offer managed cloud solutions on the platforms of major IaaS players as the market for cloud services continues to skyrocket and the need for cloud-related managed services increased in tandem.

Categories: Amazon Web Services, Datapipe, IaaS | Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Amazon Web Services Reveals Low Cost T2 Instances Marked By Burstable CPU Capability

Amazon Web Services recently introduced T2 instances, a new EC2 instance offering for applications that do not require sustained high CPU performance. The T2 instances constitute the cheapest instance available on the EC2 platform with prices starting at $0.013/hour. T2 instances deliver a baseline CPU in conjunction with the capacity to “burst” above the baseline. The baseline CPU level and bursting ability are determined by “CPU Credits” that instances can accrue when they are idle. The more the CPU is idle, the greater the ability of the T2 instance to burst above its baseline capacity. The T2 instances are ideal for web servers, small databases and development environments that sparingly use the full capacity of the CPU. Applications with high, consistent CPU needs such as computationally intensive applications or applications leveraging streaming data will require fixed performance EC2 instances in contrast to the burstable performance instances specific to the T2 instance. T2 instances are available in micro, small and medium sizes with 1, 2 and 4 GB of memory respectively. Overall, the T2 instance offering positions Amazon even more strongly with respect to its competitors in catering to the needs of organizations with low CPU needs in general, but that “require the full CPU resources for short bursts,” according to Matt Garman, VP of Amazon EC2 at Amazon Web Services.

Categories: Amazon Web Services, IaaS | Tags: , ,

Sponsored Post: The Misadventures of Cloud Computing

The following post represents a republication of this Virtustream blog post with a few minor edits to the text in paragraphs one and two. The post was authored by the Virtustream editorial team.

In collaboration with Virtustream, Cloud Computing Today is excited to debut the first illustration in a five-part cartoon series by Tom Fishburne, “The Marketoonist.” With some techie humor and a touch of irreverence, our “Misadventures of Cloud Computing” series sheds light on the day-to-day challenges facing CIOs and IT leadership teams as they navigate the complex enterprise cloud landscape.

Cloud Computing Today will be unveiling a new Virtustream cartoon every Monday for the next five weeks that puts a comical spin on what really matters when selecting an enterprise cloud solution – security, reliability and performance. We hope you check back in regularly for a midday chuckle and we encourage you to share your perspective and experiences on each cartoon’s theme.

Server Huggers. We all know them – the folks that are hesitant to say goodbye to something they can touch and feel, physical servers, for something distant and and intangible. And while it is not actually about “where to put the coffee maker,” cloud reluctance is usually an emotional reaction. Change can be unsettling.
At first blush, it makes sense. Enterprise IT departments manage complex landscapes and moving complicated, mission-critical legacy apps to the cloud is no small feat. And the thought of experiencing any downtime during the transition is a disconcerting one. Often times the stress and complexity of the transition can be misinterpreted as an aversion to the cloud all together.

But transitioning your enterprise to the cloud, even in the most complicated instances, can be a smooth, secure ride if you have the right partners on board to lead you through the journey. And while some IT departments feel like the servers they can see and touch are more safe or dependable than ones they can’t, both security and reliability are fundamental to enterprise-grade cloud service providers who offer continuous enterprise-wide monitoring on a large scale. They have a big stake in ensuring that your data remains safe and you experience zero downtime during and after the move to the cloud.

While it may be counterintuitive at first, moving to the cloud helps enterprise IT gain control of their systems and data, not the other way around. When less time and money is spent managing hardware and day-to-day upkeep, IT can put more resources into pursuing interesting projects that could make a significant impact on the business.

For more information, check out Virtustream’s LinkedIn page.

Virtustream is the enterprise-class cloud software and service provider trusted by enterprises worldwide to migrate and run their mission-critical applications in the cloud. For enterprises, service providers and government agencies, only Virtustream’s xStream™ cloud management platform (CMP) software and Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) meet the security, compliance, performance, efficiency and consumption-based billing requirements of complex production applications in the cloud – whether private, public or hybrid.

Categories: IaaS, Virtustream | Tags: , , , ,

SingleHop Raises $14.8M In Additional Funding For SMB-Focused IaaS Platform

IaaS provider SingleHop today announced the finalization of $14.8M in venture debt financing in a round led by Silicon Valley Bank with additional participation from Farnam Street Financial Inc. The financing will be used to fund SingleHop’s product development, make strategic investments and further the company’s growth more generally. SingleHop specializes in flexible managed solutions targeted toward the SMB market. Unlike other IaaS managed solutions, SingleHop boasts the capability to tier the degree of its managed hosting offerings in collaboration with the needs of its customers. Zak Boca, CEO of SingleHop, commented on the capital raise as follows:

SingleHop continues to deliver on its goal to provide the most flexible, reliable platform for cloud computing. We are ideally suited for SMBs because we have the scope and breadth of services to design the optimal infrastructure for each client, and we support our customers with a commitment to service beyond support and the best SLAs in the market. This financing ensures we are well capitalized to grow our team and our services and well positioned to make strategic investments as we continue to cement our leadership position.

The SingleHop platform enables the deployment of virtualized infrastructures from bare metal platforms, public clouds, private clouds as illustrated below:

Customers access the SingleHop platform by means of SingleHop’s proprietary LEAP user interface for deploying and managing infrastructures in addition to communicating with the company’s technical support team. LEAP is available via web-enabled access as well as mobile-devices such as smartphones and the iPad. SingleHop’s infrastructure is enabled by four data centers in North America and Europe that serve more than 4000 customers in close to 125 countries.

SingleHop’s unique focus on the SMB tier within the IaaS space positions it strongly to continue growing and establishing credibility in a space bursting with competition for enterprise IaaS customers. That said, SingleHop currently serves enterprise customers and service providers as well, and stands to increase its customer mix of enterprises as it consolidates its market traction as its SMB customers graduate to enterprise status or in conjunction with its increased market traction more generally. Today’s capital raise brings the total funding raised by SingleHop to roughly $42M in combined debt and equity financing by building upon a $27.5M capital raise led by Battery Ventures in April 2012. SingleHop’s strategy of targeting SMBs illustrates how the maturation of the IaaS market is rapidly leading to product differentiation within the IaaS space marked by the emergence of market share leaders that correspond to distinct customer segments within the larger universe market for IaaS products and services.

Categories: IaaS, SingleHop, Venture Capital

IDC Survey Results Rank IBM #1 Amongst IaaS Cloud Computing Providers

A recent IDC survey ranks IBM as the top IaaS cloud computing provider as measured by responses provided by over 400 companies and 1000 employees. IDC’s survey asked respondents which vendor is most capable of providing Infrastructure as a Service for public and private clouds. Survey results ranked Cisco second, HP third, AT&T fourth, Google fifth, Microsoft Azure sixth and Amazon Web Services seventh. Whereas IBM captured 35% of votes, Microsoft and Google claimed 16 percent and Amazon Web Services garnered 13%. According to IBM’s press release, factors used in IBM’s survey include cost, simplicity, provisioning speed and quality of service with respect to availability. Building on its July 2013 acquisition of the SoftLayer IaaS platform, Big Blue has launched a multitude of recent investments in its portfolio of cloud products and services including the IBM BlueMix Platform as a Service in February, the first BlueMix garage based in San Francisco’s Galvanize start-up community and the IBM Cloud Marketplace. While all available data suggests that IBM lags far behind Amazon Web Services in terms of IaaS cloud market share whether it be measured in revenue or installations, IDC’s recent survey underscores the positive perception had by IBM as a trusted provider of enterprise software and professional services. IDC’s report notes that “buyers selected IBM as their overall top preference among providers they believe can most effectively provision IaaS, whether private or public,”. Although the IDC report reinforces analyst concerns about the ability of vendors such as Amazon and Google to gain credibility amongst enterprise customers, its precise significance remains difficult to evaluate without more details regarding the 400 participants involved. What seems certain, however, is that IBM is progressively establishing its credibility with respect to cloud-based products and services and that its long history of collaboration with the open source community and developers, in conjunction with its infrastructure business, means that it will be a force to be reckoned with as the battle for cloud market share unfolds.

Categories: IaaS, IBM | Tags: , ,

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