Amazon Web Services: Elastic Beanstalk and CloudFormation Explained

Amazon Web Services has recently released Elastic Beanstalk and CloudFormation, two applications that automate the process of provisioning hardware resources and deploying applications on AWS’s flexible, inexpensive development environment. Introduced on January 19, Elastic Beanstalk automates the process of deploying an application on Amazon’s virtual servers once it has been written. Currently in Beta mode for Java applications only, Elastic Beanstalk manages the specifics of provisioning servers, load balancing and auto-scaling for unexpected spikes in the volume of traffic once an application is written. Elastic Beanstalk’s auto-scaling functionality scales horizontally by creating a clone of the original server instance, instead of vertically provisioning a larger server with a correspondingly appropriate memory. Developers retain the flexibility to over-ride Elastic Beanstalk’s auto-scaling features, in which case the application conforms to the scaling parameters indicated by the user.

Like Elastic Beanstalk, CloudFormation fulfills an analogous, but more ambitious function of automating application deployment. Launched on February 25, CloudFormation uses templates to automate creation of an integrated hardware infrastructure for an application containing multiple components. For example, CloudFormation takes the images, storage, security and messaging components of an application, understands their dependencies, and launches them in the right order using the template. In other words, instead of requiring a developer to write discrete scripts for each individual Amazon Machine Instance (AMI), CloudFormation gathers together certain parameters specified by a developer and creates one script for the requisite “stack” of Amazon Machine Instances of servers that collectively specifies elastic IP addresses, message queues, load balancing and auto-scaling. CloudFormation operates through JSON templates that are used to understand an application’s configuration parameters.

In his AWS blog post about CloudFormation, Jeff Barr uses the metaphor of cooking and baking to describe the application’s innovation and importance. While cooking allows for individual discretion and ad hoc changes to a recipe, baking requires precise combinations of ingredients that allow for cookies of the same taste and texture to emerge from the oven time and time again. In the same vein, CloudFormation enables developers to become bakers by automating the creation of complex systems. Moreover, developers may wish to create the same development environment a number of times, and instead of memorizing and repeating the execution of the same set of scripts over and over again, they can now use CloudFormation to automate and scale their development needs. Amazon released CloudFormation with templates for a number of open source applications such as Drupal, WordPress, Gollum and Joomla.

Amazon’s Jeff Barr put it as follows:

First, AWS is programmable, so it should be possible to build even complex systems (sometimes called “stacks”) using repeatable processes. Second, the dynamic nature of AWS makes people want to create multiple precise copies of their operating environment. This could be to create extra stacks for development and testing, or to replicate them across multiple AWS Regions….Today, all of you cooks get to become bakers!

Together with Elastic Beanstalk, CloudFormation goes a long way toward streamlining the process of deploying applications on Amazon’s EC2 environment. Despite Amazon’s lack of managed services, the 2011 first quarter release of both of these applications should render AWS more attractive to both small and enterprise customers alike.

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